Diseases Articles A-Z

About Fifth Disease - Botulism in Honey

This page contains links to eMedTV Diseases Articles containing information on subjects from About Fifth Disease to Botulism in Honey. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • About Leprosy
    Are you looking for information about leprosy? Check out this article from the eMedTV Web site. It describes the different parts of the body leprosy affects, what causes it, and why symptoms range from person to person.
  • About Typhoid Fever
    Typhoid fever affects about 21.5 million people each year. This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at typhoid fever, with information about what causes this life-threatening illness, who it affects, common symptoms, and more.
  • Ataxia Telangictasia
    Ataxia telangiectasia is a rare medical condition that causes the immune system to break down. This section of the eMedTV site offers a look at ataxia telangiectasia. Ataxia telangictasia is a common misspelling of ataxia telangiectasia.
  • Ataxia Telangiectasia
    Ataxia telangiectasia is a rare disease that breaks down the body's immune system. This eMedTV resource explores the causes, diagnosis, and treatment options for this condition, as well as the increased cancer risks people with this disease face.
  • Ataxia Telanglectasia
    Ataxia telangiectasia is a rare medical condition that causes the immune system to break down. This section of the eMedTV site offers a look at ataxia telangiectasia. Ataxia telanglectasia is a common misspelling of ataxia telangiectasia.
  • Autoimmune Deseases
    Autoimmune diseases include multiple sclerosis and scleroderma. This eMedTV article discusses what happens when immune cells mistake the body's own cells as invaders and attack them. Autoimmune deseases is a common misspelling of autoimmune diseases.
  • Autoimmune Disease
    This eMedTV segment explains that an autoimmune disease can occur when your immune cells mistake your body's cells as invaders and attack them. This article takes a closer look at this topic and lists some of the potential symptoms.
  • Autoimmune Disease Cause
    Triggers that could be connected to the causes of autoimmune diseases include the sun, infection, and drugs. This eMedTV Web page includes information about certain risk factors and triggers that may be linked to the development of autoimmune disease.
  • Autoimmune Disease Diagnosis
    Your doctor may be able to make an autoimmune disease diagnosis based on your symptoms and medical history. This eMedTV article discusses why a medical history, physical exam, and tests are needed to confirm an autoimmune disease diagnosis.
  • Autoimmune Disease Treatment
    This portion of the eMedTV site talks about the different treatment options for people who have an autoimmune disease. This article explains why treatment varies and includes a list of doctors who can help, like dermatologists and nephrologists.
  • Autoimmune Diseases
    There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, which include multiple sclerosis and scleroderma. This eMedTV resource discusses these diseases at length, which occur when your immune cells mistake your body's cells as invaders and attack them.
  • Autoimmune Disorder Symptoms
    Common autoimmune disorder symptoms, such as underactive and overactive thyroid, are discussed in this eMedTV article. This article stresses the fact that autoimmune disorder symptoms can affect people with different types of autoimmune diseases.
  • Avian Influenza
    Avian influenza is highly contagious among birds, especially domestic birds, but rarely infects people. This eMedTV article discusses avian influenza in detail, including subtypes, how it is transmitted, and the danger, if any, it poses to people.
  • Behcet's
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Behcet's disease causes widespread inflammation and canker sores throughout the body. This page also addresses treatment and includes a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Behcet's Disease
    Behcet's disease can lead to problems such as arthritis and ulcers on the genitals and mouth. This eMedTV resource offers an in-depth look at this condition, including information on possible causes, symptoms, and treatment options for this disease.
  • Behcet's Disease Diagnosis
    A physical exam, a skin-prick test, and a visual exam are all aspects of the process used to make a Behcet's disease diagnosis. This eMedTV resource explains how a doctor rules out other conditions before diagnosing Behcet's disease.
  • Behcet's Disease Prognosis
    A Behcet's disease prognosis can be hard to make, because symptoms may appear years after the initial diagnosis is made. This eMedTV page explains that, in most cases, the Behcet's disease prognosis is favorable with proper treatment.
  • Behcet's Disease Research
    Behcet's disease research is examining the role bacteria and viruses play in the formation of the disease. This eMedTV page explains these areas of focus, as well as potential benefits for participants in Behcet's disease research studies.
  • Behcet's Disease Treatment
    The Behcet's disease treatment the doctor chooses usually depends on the severity of the condition. This eMedTV resource highlights the different Behcet's disease treatment options, like corticosteroids and immunosuppressive medicines.
  • Benlista
    As this eMedTV page explains, Benlysta is a lupus drug that is given through an intravenous infusion. This article gives a brief overview of this medication and includes a link to more information. Benlista is a common misspelling of Benlysta.
  • Benlista Side Effects
    Although most people tolerate Benlysta well, some develop reactions such as nausea or a fever. This eMedTV resource takes a look at some of the side effects of this lupus medication. Benlista side effects is a common misspelling of Benlysta side effects.
  • Benlysta
    As this eMedTV page explains, Benlysta is a medication used in the treatment of lupus. This article gives a complete overview of this prescription drug, with details on how it works, possible side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Benlysta and Breastfeeding
    As this article from the eMedTV site explains, breastfeeding is generally not recommended for women undergoing treatment with Benlysta. This page addresses this issue in more detail and describes some of the possible problems that may occur.
  • Benlysta and Pregnancy
    The FDA has given Benlysta (belimumab) a pregnancy Category C rating. This eMedTV segment explains what this means and offers information on what the drug's manufacturer recommends and how this product performed in animal studies.
  • Benlysta Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV Web article, Benlysta is an injection that is given slowly into a vein (intravenously). This article explores the dosing guidelines for Benlysta, including tips to ensure a safe, effective treatment process.
  • Benlysta Drug Interactions
    Rituximab, polio vaccine, and abatacept are just a few of the drugs that may interact with Benlysta. This eMedTV Web page lists other products that may cause problems, discusses the results of these reactions, and explains how to reduce your risk.
  • Benlysta for Lupus
    If you are an adult with lupus, your healthcare provider may recommend a drug called Benlysta. This eMedTV article briefly describes this drug and explains how it is given. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Benlysta for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
    Available by prescription, Benlysta is a drug used to treat systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This eMedTV resource offers more details on this medication, with an explanation of how it performed in clinical trials.
  • Benlysta Medication Information
    This eMedTV article provides some basic information on Benlysta, a medication used to treat lupus. This resource briefly describes how it is administered and why it may not be right for everyone. A link to more details is also included.
  • Benlysta Overdose
    It is unlikely that someone would receive too much Benlysta (belimumab). In fact, as this eMedTV page explains, there have been no reported cases of an overdose with this drug. This article takes a look at what would happen in the event of an overdose.
  • Benlysta Risks
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Benlysta is generally well tolerated, but it is not without risks. This selection takes you through some of the side effects that may occur during treatment with this lupus medication.
  • Benlysta Side Effects
    People who received Benlysta in clinical trials commonly reported side effects such as fever and nausea. This eMedTV segment takes a look at other possible reactions, including some dangerous problems that can require prompt medical attention.
  • Benlysta Uses
    Benlysta is approved to treat lupus in adults. However, as this eMedTV page explains, it is meant to be used in combination with other standard lupus treatments -- not by itself. This resource takes a closer look at the specific uses of Benlysta.
  • Benlysta Warnings and Precautions
    Benlysta can cause serious allergic reactions and can make it harder for your body to fight off infections. This eMedTV segment covers important safety warnings and precautions for Benlysta, including what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Bochalism
    Botulism can be one of three types -- foodborne, wound, and infant botulism. This segment of the eMedTV archives explains what causes this potentially fatal illness and lists a few common symptoms. Botchulism is a common misspelling of botulism.
  • Botalism
    Botulism is an uncommon but severe illness that can result in death due to respiratory failure. This eMedTV resource describes the different forms of botulism and lists symptoms of the condition. Botalism is a common misspelling of botulism.
  • Botchalism
    Botulism is a rare illness caused by poisons that are produced by specific bacteria. This eMedTV article describes the effects of this serious illness and lists some of the early symptoms that may occur. Botchulism is a common misspelling of botulism.
  • Botchelism
    Botulism is a severe illness caused by toxins produced by a certain type of bacteria. This eMedTV segment lists early symptoms of botulism and explores the prognosis of this condition. Botchelism is a common misspelling of botulism.
  • Botchilism
    Botulism is a rare but serious illness that can result in paralysis or even death. This eMedTV article briefly discusses the causes, symptoms, and treatment of this serious medical condition. Botchilism is a common misspelling of botulism.
  • Botchulism
    Botulism, a rare but serious illness caused by a nerve toxin, can lead to paralysis or even death. As this eMedTV page explains, the three types of botulism include wound, foodborne, and infant botulism. Bochalism is a common misspelling of botulism.
  • Botelism
    Botulism is a rare illness that causes muscle paralysis. This page from the eMedTV Web site explores the causes of botulism and describes treatment options. A link to more information is also provided. Botelism is a common misspelling of botulism.
  • Botolism
    Botulism is a rare but serious condition that can lead to paralysis or death. This eMedTV Web page explores the causes of botulism and explains what treatment options are available for this illness. Botolism is a common misspelling of botulism.
  • Botulism
    Toxins produced by a group of bacteria known as Clostridium botulinum cause the disease known as botulism. This eMedTV page provides details about this rare but serious illness, including how it is acquired, symptoms, and treatment options.
  • Botulism Diagnosis
    Making a botulism diagnosis can be difficult because the lab test used to definitively make a diagnosis can take up to 4 days. This eMedTV Web page explains how a doctor goes about making a botulism diagnosis, including the possible tests required.
  • Botulism Disease
    While it is a potentially fatal disease, botulism can be treated; in fact, the mortality rate has dropped. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of this condition, including what causes it, the different types, and how botulism is treated.
  • Botulism Food Poisoning
    A common source of botulism food poisoning, as this eMedTV page explains, is improperly preserved home-processed foods with low acid content (like corn and beets). This page offers tips for preventing botulism, like refrigerating oils that contain garlic.
  • Botulism in Honey
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, children under 12 months old should not be fed honey, due to the risk of botulism. This article addresses the risk that honey presents to infants and explains how common it is for botulism to be transmitted this way.
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