Raynaud's Treatment

When treating Raynaud's phenomenon, most doctors recommend non-drug treatments and self-help measures first. However, doctors may prescribe medications for some patients, usually those with secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. Keep in mind that treatment is not always successful, and women who are pregnant may not be able to take medications to treat the disease.

An Introduction to Raynaud's Treatment

At this point, there is no cure for Raynaud's phenomenon. Therefore, the goals of treatment are to reduce the number and severity of attacks and to prevent tissue damage and loss in the fingers and toes.
 
Most doctors are conservative with their recommendations for treating Raynaud's; that is, they recommend non-drug treatments and self-help measures first. Doctors may prescribe medications for some patients, usually those with secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. In addition, as part of treatment, patients are treated for any underlying disease or condition that may cause secondary Raynaud's phenomenon.
 

Self-Help Options for Treating Raynaud's

Several non-drug treatments and self-help measures can help decrease the severity of Raynaud's attacks and promote overall well-being. Self-help measures that can be used to treat Raynaud's include:
 
  • Taking action during an attack
  • Keeping warm
  • Not smoking
  • Controlling stress
  • Exercising regularly
  • Seeing a doctor if questions or concerns arise.
     
(Click Raynaud's Self-Help Strategies for more information on treatment methods that do not require medication.)
 

Information about Raynaud's

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